Title

Wetland diversity: The limits of generalization.

SelectedWorks Author Profiles:

Christopher F. Meindl

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2005

Date Issued

January 2005

Date Available

June 2014

ISSN

0022-1341

Abstract

Generalizations are important tools in learning about complex phenomena such as wetlands. Geography teachers at all levels use generalizations in order to help students grasp the discipline's major themes. One of geography's major themes is that of place, and that includes uniqueness of place. Accordingly, it is important to recognize the diversity of wetland environments because different wetlands provide different sets of ecological functions and values to people. Successful attempts to merge the study of wetlands and geography must weave together discussion of generalizations about wetlands with attempts to foster some appreciation for wetland diversity.

Comments

Abstract only. Full-text article is available only through licensed access provided by the publisher. Published in Journal of Geography, 104 (6), 243-256. DOI: 10.1080/00221340508978646 Members of the USF System may access the full-text of the article through the authenticated link provided.

Language

en_US

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.