Title

Perceived personnel development needs of postsecondary disabilities services professionals.

SelectedWorks Author Profiles:

Lyman Dukes

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2004

Date Issued

January 2004

Date Available

September 2011

Abstract

Students with disabilities have begun to make significant strides with regard to the fulfillment of traditional adult roles. Though not perfect, transition planning has improved the outcomes for students with disabilities who enter college and matriculate. However, many barriers still exist for students with disabilities who have a desire to continue their education following high school. There has been a significant increase in the supports available for students with disabilities at the postsecondary level, but these services are rarely appropriately planned or validated as effective. An important step toward well-planned and empirically validated services is the appropriate professional preparation of the staff who oversee services for students with disabilities at colleges and universities. In fact, the President's Commission on Excellence in Education has recommended that all relevant postsecondary level personnel be provided supports that will allow greater numbers of students with disabilities to successfully complete a postsecondary education. This manuscript describes postsecondary disability service providers and the supports their offices need to offer. It reviews the evidence that training is necessary and recommends methods for improving personnel preparation.

Comments

Abstract only. Full-text article is available only through licensed access provided by the publisher. Published in Teacher Education and Special Education, 27(2), 134-45. doi: 10.1177/088840640402700205 Members of the USF System may access the full-text of the article through the authenticated link provided.

Publisher

Teacher Education Division of the Council for Exceptional Children

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.