Title

Terrorism, global journalism, and the myth of the nation state.

SelectedWorks Author Profiles:

Deni Elliott

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2004

Date Issued

2004-01-01

Date Available

2012-12-20

Abstract

Citizens require independent reporting more than ever in the news coverage of conflict in the 21st century. The traditional role of national governments has been compromised both by terrorism and by technology that makes hard borders porous. It is unlikely that citizens or policymakers will cope with those changes unless they are reminded how the world has changed. That is an essential role for journalism, and provides a distinction between the terms nationalistic press and patriotic press. A nationalistic press simply repeats governmental messages; a patriotic press reports independently and keeps fundamental interests of citizens in mind.

Comments

Citation only. Full-text article is available only through licensed access provided by the publisher. Published in Journal of Mass Media Ethics, 19(1), 29-45. Members of the USF System may access the full-text of the article through the authenticated link provided below.

Language

en_US

Publisher

Routledge

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.