Title

Climate science and peace in the Middle East.

SelectedWorks Author Profiles:

Arturo Jimenez-Bacardi

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2013

ISSN

1040-2659

Abstract

While the Israeli–Palestinian (and Arab) peace process is mired in a complex political crisis, the region is now facing an even more daunting crisis as a result of dramatic hydrological changes. Groundwater extraction rates in the region’s coastal and mountain aquifers are not sustainable. Climate change is expected to increase temperatures, reduce rainfall, raise sea level, and generate more severe weather events. Seawater intrusion into the groundwater systems, which are critical to the basic needs of one half of the region’s population, is also expected. As the hydrological system changes, population and economic growth will increase the demand for freshwater to meet basic needs, as well as water demand for food production and industry. This is likely to lead to even higher extraction rates along with increased investments into reuse and desalinization.

Comments

Citation only. Full-text article is available through licensed access provided by the publisher. Members of the USF System may access the full-text of the article through the authenticated link provided.

Language

en_US

Publisher

Routledge

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.