SelectedWorks Author Profiles:

Sharon L. Segrest

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2011

Date Issued

2011-01-01

Date Available

2012-11-02

Abstract

Belonging to a group that is in the minority in an organization (e.g., racial, cultural) inherently puts individuals at a social disadvantage among the majority group, which can position them in ways so as not to be able to build political skill and acquire power and influence in organizations. Those in the minority must feel genuinely committed to their groups while simultaneously leveraging opportunities outside their groups, if they are to secure and maintain personal power. The propositions provided in this conceptualization argue that individuals who are less committed to their group tend to be significantly more personally maladjusted, which, in turn, reduces the degree of political skill they develop and undermine their personal power levels and effectiveness.

Comments

This is an electronic version (post-print) of an article published in International Journal of Human Resources Development and Management, 2011 Vol.11, No.2/3/4, pp.235 - 256. doi: 10.1504/IJHRDM.2011.041674

Language

en_US

Publisher

Inderscience

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Included in

Business Commons

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