Title

Language in the English as a second language and general education classrooms: A tutorial.

SelectedWorks Author Profiles:

Alejandro Brice

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2006

Date Issued

2006-01-01

Date Available

2011-08-11

Abstract

As the culturally and linguistically diverse population of the United States continues to increase dramatically, speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and special education teachers in particular face the challenge of how best to assess and teach those students whose primary language is not English. The changing U.S. demographics are driving a need for a more comprehensive understanding of students learning English as a second language and the effect upon their education of learning English as a second language. A substantial number of English language learner (ELL) students, with and without disabilities, may not possess the requisite classroom discourse or pragmatic skills, may face difficulties, and may be incapable of fully benefiting in their learning. This tutorial will discuss factors related to describing classroom discourse in the context of five ethnographic studies, with particular attention paid to pragmatic language skills for ELL students with and without disabilities. This article will also discuss strategies for what these students need to know regarding pragmatic language skills and which strategies school professionals need to implement for bilingual ELL students (i.e., regarding planning and communication in delivering instruction). This knowledge should assist school professionals in making more appropriate decisions in assessment and instruction for these students.

Comments

Abstract only. At this time, full-text article is available only through licensed access provided by the publisher. Published in Communication Disorders Quarterly, v27 n4 p240-247 Sum 2006. Members of the USF System may access the full-text of the article through the authenticated link provided.

Language

en_US

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.