USFSP Honors Program Theses (Undergraduate)

First Advisor

Thesis Director: Dr. Tiffany Chenneville Associate Professor, College of Arts and Sciences

Second Advisor

Thesis Committee Member: Christina Salnaitis, Ph.D. Instructor, College of Arts and Sciences

Third Advisor

Thesis Committee Member: Thomas Smith, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Director of University Honors Program

Publisher

University of South Florida St. Petersburg

Document Type

Thesis

Language

en_US

Date Available

2017-10-04

Publication Date

2015

Date Issued

2015-12-04

Abstract

Peer support has come a long way since its induction into the mental health field in the 18th century and its attempts to design peer organizations in the early 20th century to where it is today as a mental health service reimbursed by Medicaid in 34 states. Since peer specialists are vital to recovery oriented care, it is important to understand job satisfaction among peer specialists. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of job training and role clarity on job satisfaction. A three part, 77-item electronic survey was administered to 195 peer specialists. Results suggest a significant negative correlation between job satisfaction and training involving self-study. Results also show a significant positive correlation between job satisfaction and the availability of a peer mentor to shadow during on-the-job training. These findings have important implications for the development of peer specialist training curricula.

Comments

A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the University Honors Program

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Share

COinS