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Adult attachment theory. Adult attachment theory is a conceptual framework that describes the dynamics of ones actions in interpersonal relationships (Hazen and Shaver, 1987).

Mindfulness is “paying attention in a particular way: on purpose, in the present moment, and nonjudgmentally” and “the self-regulation of attention and the non-evaluative acceptance of one’s immediate experiences” (Kabat-Zinn, 1994, p.14).

Emotion regulation refers to the ability to influence, experience and express emotions in a manner that is conducive to one’s well-being (Gross, 1998).

There is a large body of correlational research demonstrating a positive correlation between attachment security and mindfulness. However, there are no longitudinal studies and only two experimentally designed studies to date, with somewhat conflicting results (Stevenson, Emerson, & Millings, 2017) .

In a two-part study, it was found that priming state attachment security did result not in increases in state mindfulness and that priming state mindfulness did not result in increases in state attachment security. However indirect effects were not examined (Pepping et al., 2015). More recent research has found that priming state attachment anxiety predicts decreases in state mindfulness, via increases in state emotion regulation (Melen et al., 2016).

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Presented as part of the 2019 USFSP Undergraduate Research Symposium held April 16, 2019.

Faculty mentor: Dr. Anna Dixon

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State Emotion Regulation as a Mediator of the Relationship Between State Attachment Security and State Mindfulness

Adult attachment theory. Adult attachment theory is a conceptual framework that describes the dynamics of ones actions in interpersonal relationships (Hazen and Shaver, 1987).

Mindfulness is “paying attention in a particular way: on purpose, in the present moment, and nonjudgmentally” and “the self-regulation of attention and the non-evaluative acceptance of one’s immediate experiences” (Kabat-Zinn, 1994, p.14).

Emotion regulation refers to the ability to influence, experience and express emotions in a manner that is conducive to one’s well-being (Gross, 1998).

There is a large body of correlational research demonstrating a positive correlation between attachment security and mindfulness. However, there are no longitudinal studies and only two experimentally designed studies to date, with somewhat conflicting results (Stevenson, Emerson, & Millings, 2017) .

In a two-part study, it was found that priming state attachment security did result not in increases in state mindfulness and that priming state mindfulness did not result in increases in state attachment security. However indirect effects were not examined (Pepping et al., 2015). More recent research has found that priming state attachment anxiety predicts decreases in state mindfulness, via increases in state emotion regulation (Melen et al., 2016).